How to Create an Exciting Wedding Celebration!

View From The Stage

Here are some things to consider when planning the flow of your wedding, if your goal is to maximize the time on the dance floor:

Introductions:

We are seeing bridal party introductions less often, and this is not a bad thing. Think about it, after the cocktail hour, guests enter the ballroom dancing while the venue staff and band leader spends time gathering and lining up the bridal party for their intros into the party. The bride and groom, as well as others being introduced miss at least 15 minutes of their party, if not more.

We suggest the bride and groom enter the ballroom when the doors open, dancing with their guests. When ready, the couple is formally introduced and asked to the center of the dance floor for their first dance. If you really want the bridal party to be introduced, you may consider having them enter as a group without individual introductions.

Dance, Dance Dance!

A good band will get the guests dancing immediately as they enter a ballroom. As for the bride and groom intro and first dance, I suggest that the guests surround the dance floor. After the first dance, we ask the guests to join in for a high energy dance set before they are seated for their meal. We also encourage dancing between courses. With the trend toward elaborate cocktail hours, most guests aren’t in a hurry to eat that quickly. Let your entertainers help them work up their appetite by encouraging as much dancing as possible.

Bouquet, Garter, Cake Cutting?

We see very few brides throwing their bouquets and even less grooms removing and tossing garters. As for Cake Cutting, the trend is toward “silent cake cutting” where the couple simply slips away with their photographer and Maitre’d , while the party continues. By eliminating these formalities, there are no interruptions after dinner, and the dance floor is more likely to remain full.

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